What does diversion me for me?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What does diversion me for me?

A few weeks before I turned 18, I was caught shoplifting along with my sister who is 15. She was on probation and had to do committee service and everything was written off. My parents were told by my sisters probationer officer that my case was going to be dropped because I was almost 18. Its been 6 months since the incident and I received in the mail a paper saying that my case has been referred to a diversion program. The program is called AWARE. Does this mean I am on probation? What will happen?

Asked on April 6, 2013 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The California Penal Code allows leeway for first offenders such as yourself and an "out" to be free of a criminal record which could haunt you the rest of your life.  You are permitted to enter in to a diversion class which means if you take a theft class and stay out of trouble that the case will be dismissed against you.  You are not on technically on probation since you have not been convicted but you can think of it in those terms if it helps you stay straight. This is good because if you were to apply for a job with a private employer you could legally say that you had never been convicted of a crime. There are fines and fees - but they are small -  for the diversion class.  Now, the arrest/citation will always be on your record unless expunged (or maybe not if you were 17 and considered a minor; it should be sealed.  Double check). The diversion shows the case as dismissed.  Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption