If my employer is closing down in one state and moving to another state, how long do they have to give me an end date for my employment?

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If my employer is closing down in one state and moving to another state, how long do they have to give me an end date for my employment?

A company is closing down in one state and moving to another state and gave me an offer to move with them but I said no to the offer. How long do they have before they have to tell me my official end date with them? Not how long before I am laid off but how long do they have before they have to let me know when I’ll be laid off? Can they wait weeks to tell me the date? or do they need to provide me with an end of employment date right away? I am under a contract and can’t leave until their end date; if they don’t tell me an end date can I voluntarily leave without breaking the contract?

Asked on July 13, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If your employer is shutting down in one state and moving to another, it does not have to advise you of the last day you will be working for it even though you were offered a posiiton in the new state.

If you have a written contract with your employer through a set date, you should be paid for work through that date even if the employer shuts down in the state you are in before then so long as you are performing your duties as an employee competently.

You can end your contract before its end date. Your employer cannot force you to continue working under your contract if you do not want to. If you quit before the end of your contract's end date, you simply are not entitled to wages from your employer since you quit.

You can voluntarily end your employement without breaking your contract. Rather than ending your employment, since you know that your days are numbered as an employee at your current job, you should start interviewing for a new position elsewhere.

Given the uncertainty as to your last work day, why don't you meet with your supervisor of the company's human resources department and get an estimate when your final day as an employee with this company will be?

Good luck.

 

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If your employer is shutting down in one state and moving to another, it does not have to advise you of the last day you will be working for it even though you were offered a posiiton in the new state.

If you have a written contract with your employer through a set date, you should be paid for work through that date even if the employer shuts down in the state you are in before then so long as you are performing your duties as an employee competently.

You can end your contract before its end date. Your employer cannot force you to continue working under your contract if you do not want to. If you quit before the end of your contract's end date, you simply are not entitled to wages from your employer since you quit.

You can voluntarily end your employement without breaking your contract. Rather than ending your employment, since you know that your days are numbered as an employee at your current job, you should start interviewing for a new position elsewhere.

Given the uncertainty as to your last work day, why don't you meet with your supervisor of the company's human resources department and get an estimate when your final day as an employee with this company will be?

Good luck.

 


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