30 minute lunch break not really 30 minutes.

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

30 minute lunch break not really 30 minutes.

I work for a large company that has a very large building and we are allowed to eat only in certain areas that the company allows.To get to where we can eat, it can take anywhere from 1 minute to 8 minutes of time one way.The company has made it clear that this travel time has to be on our 30 minute break not on the company’s time. To make matters worse, we have a meeting right at the end of lunch so we have to cut into our lunch time once again, just to be at the meeting on time. If the meeting is far away from our work area, or lunch area, it does not matter, the company still forces us to use our lunch time to get there. In reality, many people only are able to get a 20 minute lunch break due to the forced lunch locations, and meeting right after. I live in WA. Is this legal? To me it cant be because then they could continue to move the meeting further and further away until there is zero time to eat lunch and whether we get our 30 minutes is fully dependent on where our work area is vs where are lunch area is, and where our meeting will be. Whether the company steals one minute, or 10 minutes, either way it is stealing time. What is your take?

Asked on February 28, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

A 30 minute lunch break does not get extended for the time it may take the employee to get from his/her work location to someplace he/she could eat: it's a 30 minute break, not 30 minutes guaranteed to eat. Often, employees have to spend some time going from where they are to where they can eat (e.g. a retail store employee can't eat on the sales floor.) So they don't need to give you extra time in this case.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption