Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Sep 15, 2020

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No. Although Social Security and certain other government plans (such as your state’s worker’s compensation, Veteran’s disability, etc.) do provide some disability protection, they were not intended to give you adequate replacement income ‘ only to provide a subsistence level of income. Any other coverage will add to this. Only a few states require employers to provide short-term disability coverage. Social Security may provide coverage after 26 weeks, but the requirements are quite strict (you must be totally and permanently disabled and unable to earn an income through any type of employment). Seventy percent of applications for payments are rejected. Even if you are eligible, the payments you would receive are usually not adequate to replace the income loss caused by your disability.