Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Sep 15, 2020

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To file a disability claim you would normally complete and submit a claim form, including a letter from your doctor describing your condition and the likely prognosis. The insurance company may ask for additional information or require you to be examined by their doctor — especially if the disability is expected to last for a long time.

All information you submit is considered confidential — only people within the insurance company may need to share it with other departments in order to evaluate your claim. No one not required to participate in the evaluation of your claim should have access to your information. However, any promise of confidentiality within a large organization is only as good as the controls the company places on access to information. Confidentiality controls can sometimes be thwarted by people who are persistent in trying to get information.