Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Sep 15, 2020

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Most insurance companies only surcharge one car in the household if there is only one driver. They will usually charge the most expensive car, but some will only put the charge on the car you indicate that you use as your primary vehicle. It does not sound like you need to keep three cars. However, if you get rid of the two extra cars you will lose the multi car discount, which can be a credit of up to 20% of the premium. Nevertheless, your overall insurance cost would decrease if you got rid of two vehicles. On the other hand, there may be practical things to consider: You may be better served to keep one car as an extra, in case your primary vehicle is in the shop or is damaged in an accident. You will need to assess your needs and finances before deciding what you want to do.