Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Sep 15, 2020

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In addition to your deceased husband, the umbrella policy covered you and any other members of your household. The excess umbrella policy provides additional liability protection over your home and auto insurance, as well as boats and rental properties. The policy is written in increments of $1,000,000 and the premium is based on the number of exposures (homes, rentals, autos, drivers, boats, etc). The additional liability protection can provide you with a peace of mind in the event of a major liability loss.

With an umbrella policy, you are required to carry high liability limits on the home, autos and any other exposures but the costs to increase the liability and of an umbrella policy itself are relatively inexpensive. The additional protection could be well worth the cost although much depends upon your assets and what other exposures you have. If you’re on a limited income, discuss this with your insurance agent and see what he/she might recommend.