Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Sep 15, 2020

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No, no, and yes. The “better coverage” is now scheduled to be implemented slowly through 2019 (at which time the prescription “donut hole” will be fully eliminated). The healthcare reform package of 2010 itself did not address many Medicare issues, but coincidentally the Federal government (in the form of CMMS) has changed the supplement plans for the first time since the early 1990’s. Starting June 1, 2010, a new series of plan options will be available that universally cover preventive visits annually and include hospice care. Some of the older plans are eliminated due to low use, as are certain provisions (home health care, for example) that had very low usage. If you do not want to move into one of the newer plans you may stay where you are and be grandfathered in your current plan.