Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

Full Bio →

Written by

Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

Full Bio →

Reviewed by Jeffrey Johnson
Managing Editor & Insurance Lawyer

UPDATED: Feb 24, 2015

Advertiser Disclosure

It’s all about you. We want to help you make the right legal decisions.

We strive to help you make confident insurance and legal decisions. Finding trusted and reliable insurance quotes and legal advice should be easy. This doesn’t influence our content. Our opinions are our own.

Editorial Guidelines: We are a free online resource for anyone interested in learning more about legal topics and insurance. Our goal is to be an objective, third-party resource for everything legal and insurance related. We update our site regularly, and all content is reviewed by experts.

Partnership for long term care programs are basically a way for users to participate in a state program where they can still qualify for Medicaid without having to spend every dollar they’ve saved. The programs have been around for many years, but because of changing laws, only four states created programs in the early years – California, Connecticut, Indiana and New York.

Changes in law after these four states created their programs left other states with little incentive to create their own. Luckily, these four states have been “grandfathered” in – meaning, they can keep the programs that are set in place. To participate in the partnership, you must buy a long term care policy that contains the basic benefits of your state’s program.

Under these programs, you can generally apply for Medicaid benefits even if you have not sold all of your assets as long as you

  1. purchase the policy under the program,
  2. live in the state while receiving long term care services (note: CT and IN have a reciprocal agreement that allows you to transfer benefits from one state to the other), and
  3. receive and exhaust the benefits under the policy for long term care services.

Additional information

To receive additional information on the programs set up in California, Connecticut, Indiana and New York, click on the websites:

California: www.dhs.ca.gov/cpltc/ Connecticut: www.opm.state.ct.us/pdpd4/ltc/home.htm Indiana: www.state.in.us/fssa/iltcp/ New York: www.nyspltc.org/

In addition, several other states are considering creating partnership programs. Contact your state’s insurance department for additional information.