Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Sep 15, 2020

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The standard homeowner policy is designed to repair or replace your home if it is damaged or destroyed by a covered peril regardless of customizing for a disabled person. Insurance companies have their own ways of determining replacement cost from a computer program based on information on the home (square footage, quality of construction, number of stories, type of roof, etc) all the way up to a physical inspection of the home by an appraiser hired by the insurance company. Any changes you have made to your home to accommodate your disability should be considered while determining the replacement cost. You can assist your agent/company by advising the costs incurred when you customized your home, making sure this is included in the figures to determine replacement cost.

If you have had your home insured for a number of years with the same insurance company, this may be a good time to sit down with your agent and go over the replacement value of your home. While most policies include inflation protection, thus increasing the amount of insurance every year, it does not guarantee that has kept up with the actual cost to rebuild. Also, if you have added or updated any part of your home, those costs might not be included in the original figures.