Would I have grounds for a lawsuit for discrimination

I am pregnant and my hours were cut.
When I stated I need hours my boss
replied that I am pregnant and if I was to
go on bedrest she would be stuck
working the hours and she was hiring
someone else and it wasn’t up for
debate. I have screenshots of the
comments.someone quit and she said i
would get the hours while she was
looking for someone else. I then quit
shortly after because I was tired of the
treatment.

Asked on June 8, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If your hours were cut when there was no need based on your own actions to do so, but simply because of what "could" happen becasue you were pregnant, that may well be illegal employment discrimination: possibly against women, and/or possibly against the disabled (for certain purposes, pregnancy is treated as a temporary disability). If you had gone to her with a doctor's note saying that you needed light duty or shorter hours, she could have cut your hours--that would have been based on your actions, in going to her to request a modification of employment. But in this case, it was just the fact of your pregnancy which caused the cut, which is likely illegal: discrimination based on status or condition, not on actions or limitations on working, is not allowed. You should contact the federal EEOC or your state equal/civil rights agency about bringing a complaint.


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