why would the police say that they cannot come into your house due to certain people inside?

The mother of my children was arrested
today at the house where her and her
sisters live. Her charges are sale of
oxycodone and unlawful use of a two way
communications device. she was outside
when an officer in an unmarked car
pulled up and arrested her. Her sisters
told me that they let her put some make
up on before they put her in the car.
they would not let her enter the home
and then asked her sisters who was in
the house right now. they told them
wich was her 2 sisters and a friend and
police said they could not the house
due to certain people inside. I’ve
never heard of the police NOT wanting
to enter your home and I could find
nothing on Google so any info would be
greatly appreciated

Asked on June 27, 2016 under Criminal Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

There is no legal reason the police could not enter. There are several practical or everyday reasons which are possible, such as:
1) If they felt that the person was coming out peacefully, but could be violent (or that there was another potentially violent person inside) if confronted in the home.
2) There were people who are cooperating with the police (e.g. informants) in the home, and the police did not want to compromise them by being seen entering the home.
3) There were young children inside, and the police felt it better to allow someone to surrender rather than arrest a person (such as a family friend or relative) in front of them in the home.
4) There had been an agreement that someone would surrender if allowed to do so with some control over the process, and the police were determined to honor it.


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