where do I start smh….what can I do as business owner when a contractor owes outstanding balance? also is threatening with countersuut for slander ECT pretty much bullying his way out

I was approached with a opportunity to roof paris island through a friend that knew a company needing a subcontractor. Long story short I went down with my workers. To south carolina and performed work as agreed. Balance got to be outstanding and literally just got cut off communication. Waited a week at a hotel without any kind of corosponda ce.when I left to come back I found out they went behind my back a got my employees to jump ship and bribed them .I come back with no money and bills out the a and no employees. I’m a llc. Ive made countless attempts to message and correspond this situation. Has caused grave damage to my company and has caused financial situations also sold me a car with only a bill of sale knkwing they had no title to produce due to a company having title vome to find out . ive lost my company and find myself selling my trailors and things ive worked to get as a company. This is a good reason why small business owners as myself don’t make it out first year.this must nkt go un noticed. This is new to me and I’m lost on where to turn.
Sincerely
Richard Crabtree
Crabtrees home improvements

Asked on March 11, 2018 under Business Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

1) You can sue them for any money they owe you for work which you did but which they did not pay. You sue based on breach of contract (violating the agreement, whether written or unwritten/oral, pursuant to which you agreed to do work for pay) and for "unjust enrichment" (they cannot take or accept work which they knew was being done for pay without paying).
2) If they sold you a car without having title, that was fraud and you could sue them for that (e.g. to get your money back).

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

1) You can sue them for any money they owe you for work which you did but which they did not pay. You sue based on breach of contract (violating the agreement, whether written or unwritten/oral, pursuant to which you agreed to do work for pay) and for "unjust enrichment" (they cannot take or accept work which they knew was being done for pay without paying).
2) If they sold you a car without having title, that was fraud and you could sue them for that (e.g. to get your money back).


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