When forming an LLC should I put my home address on it?

I’m under the assumption I have to have an LLC formed prior to finding a location for the business. Once I find the location then do I chance the LLC location to the new location?

Asked on November 14, 2014 under Business Law, Virginia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

1) You do need an address to form the LLC, so if your home address is the only one you have, use it.

2) Yes, you have to form the LLC first if you want the space to be rented or purchased by the LLC, rather than by you personally. So unless you want to personally own or rent the business space, you do have to 1st form the LLC.

3) You are not legally required to change the address the LLC is registered to--a business can have a legal address and/or maling address separte from its work-a-day space. There are advantages to having them conform, if you don't want to potentially have legal or other documents sent to your home, and if you want to avoid having creditors think that your home if owned by the business and so (if you can't pay some debt and they have to take collections/legal action) having them try to put a lien on your home. On the other hand, having the LLC's official address be your home *may* facilitate taking some deductions for home expenses as business expenses, and would be more convenient if you're not certain that the space you rent will be the businesses long-term home (that way, you won't have to keep changing the address every time you move).


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