What’s the round figure or estimate number that I can get a pit bull bite case?

What’s the round figure or estimate number that I can get a pit bull bite case?

Asked on June 5, 2017 under Personal Injury, Maryland

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

The "number" that you can get for a personal injury for pain and suffering varies from case-to-case, as they are too difficult to calculate without a close examination of the facts of each accident. While you can attempt to negotiate a settlement on your own, the fact is that even after attorney fees, typicaaly a personal injury lawyer can get a substabtially higher settlement than the injured party can attain on theirr own. At this point, you should at least consult with one before taking any further action since such a consultations are free. In the maentime here a links to 2 articles that you my find to be of help:
https://injury-law.freeadvice.com/injury-law/injury-law/personal_injury_value_of_damages.htm
https://injury-law.freeadvice.com/injury-law/injury-law/reasonable_pain_and_suffering.htm

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

The figure cannot be determined because it depends on your medical bills, medical reports, and wage loss.
Compensation for the medical bills is straight reimbursement.  The medical reports document your injury and are used to determine compensation for pain and suffering which is an amount in addition to the medical bills.  Compensation for wage loss is straight reimbursement.
There isn't any mathematical formula for determining compensation for pain and suffering.  It depends on the medical reports, the extent of your injury, whether you have fully recovered or whether you have residual complaints after completing your treatment and being released by the doctor.


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