What to do if my automobile contract is fraud?

I purchased a vehicle March 18 and with a few hours the vehicle was smoking
and making a loud noise. I went to the dealership the next day and was told
they would look at it but I had to leave it. I explained it was my only vehicle at
the time and just spent all my money I had on the down payment. They knew I
was a veteran on limited funds. I later had the truck looked at and major issues
to include safety issues is wrong with hew vehicle. they would not put me into
another vehicle. I later found the address on the contact was under a different
business name as the business I went to.. I also found out the sales rep signed
someone else name as his. I did a carfax report on the last report shoed over
200,00 miles but my odometer says 102,000 but I did signed an exempt form I
later asked them why would they say it had low miles they said they have no
clue on the history. What should I do? I already contacted the Federal trade
commision.

Asked on April 5, 2018 under Business Law, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Fraud provides a basis to either rescind a contract (undo or reverse it; i.e. return vehicle, get money back) or seek compensation (such as the cost to repairs or correct issues). If the dealer lied about material (or important) things, like the condition or mileage, to get you to buy the car, that may well be fraud (since fraud is a misrepresenation or lie made to get you to do something or buy something). So if you believe the dealer lied to you about something important (like condition or mileage) and they will not voluntarily offer you compensation, you could sue them based on fraud.


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