What proof would I need to file a harassment suite at work?

I work in an all male department and at the moment my entire department
is collaborating with each to put together evidence to get me fired. I have
already approached my HR department but of course the defending party
acted as though they had no idea what I am talking about. I work in tech
support and have received several emails with the same property but
different contact information so this is the only proof a this time. I need to
know what kind of tangible proof I need to move forward.

Asked on June 10, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

From the context, I assume that you are the only female in the department. For illegal sex-based harassment, you need proof (1) that harassment is occuring--suspicions are not enough; and (2) evidence that you brought this proof (not just unprovable suspecions) to your employer and despite evidence of harassment, they refused to act. (An employer is only liable if despite credible reason to believe there may be harassment or discrimination, they fail to take appropriate action.) It is not clear to me what is meant by "several emails with the same property but different contact information" so it is not clear if that shows any proof of harassment: for example, is there anything to show that this has been sent by your coworkers? If you can't trace those emails to coworkers, then based on what you have written, there does not appear to be proof of harassment at this time.


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