What to do about possible pregnancy and racial discrimination?

I was recently let go from a GM position at a hotel and I believe that it was because I am a young, pregnant, white female. Although the Korean hotel owners have other younger employees none of them were recently promoted and none are pregnant. I was called a “stupid white girl that likes to open your big fat mouth” for having a casual conversation with a friend/co-worker about my wage. I was also asked when I would be leaving to have the baby because I was already getting fat (at the time I was only 3 months and just starting to show). Should I speak with an employement law attorney? In Kern County, CA.

Asked on August 21, 2011 California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You should definitely speak with an employment attorney. Discrimination based on race, sex, and pregnancy are illegal across the nation; I believe that you state (California) also makes discrimination based on national origin (e.g. non-Korean) illegal as well. From what you write, based on the comments you heard, you may well have a claim for workplace discrimination; if you do, you may be able to recover lost wages, forward-looking wages, and possibly other damages or compensation or attorney's fees as well. It would certainly seem worth your while to consult with an employment law attorney, who can evaluate your case in greater depth and detail, especially since many such attorneys will provide a free initial consultation. Good luck.


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