What information do I put in the sworn financial statement?

I am getting divorced, and we are trying for an uncontested divorce. I have been unable to work for the past 3 years due to a complication with my medical issues but prior to that and for several months after, I was helping my husband with the rent from $300 per month to $500 per month after his dad died. I was also buying all the food related groceries for the home we don’t have any kids together but his daughter from a previous marriage lives with us, as does his best friend’s son, and my father did up until Russ filed for divorce. Even for the past 3 years, I was still buying groceries until my unemployment and early retirement money ran out, which was a couple weeks ago. My husband has an attorney who, literally 2days after I told him that I couldn’t afford groceries anymore, sent him home with a sworn financial statement for me to fill out we still live together. Do I use my current situation to fill out this form, which is that I don’t have any money coming in, and I don’t contribute monetarily to the household currently, or put that I buy bought groceries until very recently, and used to pay rent? I don’t want it to look like I’m trying to pull something when I’m not. I just want to do it right Also, do you think that I need my own attorney since my husband has one? If so, I will need to borrow from my father to pay for one.

Asked on January 22, 2019 under Family Law, Colorado

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

Just include your current information on the financial statement. You should be represented by an attorney in your divorce. Without an attorney, you will be at a disadvantage because your husband is represented by an attorney. It would be a mistake not to have an attorney.


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