What happens if I have a warrant out for my arrest for a failure to appear in court and I want to travel by air?

Can I flying within the U.s. with no problem? What about internationally?

Asked on August 28, 2016 under Criminal Law, Connecticut

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

The fact is that not all airlines check the names of passengers against criminal databases for domestic flights. This is because to these databases are large, so to perform such checks would be a huge time/financial undertaking. That having been said, international flights are a different matter as databases generally are checked. In fact, typically in order to gain entry into a country a travel visa must first be obtained and since criminal records are checked, a visa would in all liklihood be denied you.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

When a person pleads “no contest”, then they are admitting that the facts in the complaint are true. The judge may or may not ask for an explanation. In a misdemeanor case, the court will typically enter a finding of guilt. The fact is that there is typically no difference between pleading guilty or no contest. Only in certain cases does a “no contest” plea matter. For example, if someone pleads guilty then that plea can be used as an admission in later civil/criminal cases. However, if they plead “no contest” then their admissions can’t be used against them in later cases.


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