what does “felony admonitions to the defendent” mean?

Asked on July 2, 2009 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

M.M., Member, New York and Illinois Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Felony admonitions to the defendant are basically warnings, typically included in a plea agreement, that put the defendant on notice about what can happen if the defendant pleads guilty to a particular charge. They typically include prison sentences that can be handed down for particular crimes. The idea is to make the defendant aware of all of the potential consequences if the defendant agrees to a particular plea agreement. These need to be reviewed in fine detail by a qualified attorney who is familiar with criminal defense practice in the jurisdiction in question. It would be unwise to trust the prosecution when they offer one plea agreement verbally and another plea agreement in writing. Yes, the felony admonitions to the defendant typically talk about a worst-case sentencing scenario, but worst-case scenarios can and do happen, so be careful.

M.M., Member, New York and Illinois Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Felony admonitions to the defendant are basically warnings, typically included in a plea agreement, that put the defendant on notice about what can happen if the defendant pleads guilty to a particular charge. They typically include prison sentences that can be handed down for particular crimes. The idea is to make the defendant aware of all of the potential consequences if the defendant agrees to a particular plea agreement. These need to be reviewed in fine detail by a qualified attorney who is familiar with criminal defense practice in the jurisdiction in question. It would be unwise to trust the prosecution when they offer one plea agreement verbally and another plea agreement in writing. Yes, the felony admonitions to the defendant typically talk about a worst-case sentencing scenario, but worst-case scenarios can and do happen, so be careful.


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