What does an MIP mean for my future?

The other night I was given a Minor in Possession ticket. I am 19 and I

cooperated with the officer giving me the citation. He simply gave me a $100

citation and there was a date I could show up in court if I chose to fight it. I

am a first time offender and have a clean record besides this blemish. How

serious is this charge? How can it affect future jobs? and are there other

options like a first time offender program I should look into or should I just

pay the fine and forget about it?

Asked on February 28, 2016 under Criminal Law, Colorado

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

For a first time MIP offense, you may go home with only a ticket, avoiding a potential night in jail. However, if you attend college, then you can expect additional disciplinary action to be taken by the school. Additionally, a criminal charge can make getting a job more difficult. And finally, the state may revoke your driving privileges; for a first conviction the license revocation will be for 3 months unless that you complete the required alcohol class. The fact is that, you really should consult with a DUI attorney; they may be able to get the charge dismissed or at least get you a lesser penalty. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.