What do I do if my brothers have take exclusive rights to my deceased parents’ property which we share title to?

My brothers changed the locks to the house and told me to sign over my 1/5 ownership. When I request information on the property, I am verbally assaulted. I was physically attacked the last time I was at the home and do not feel safe. The have put the house up for sale and continue to work with the listing agent without discussing or make collective decisions with me. They are angry that I found out that they were selling the house and tried to exclude me from the seller’s agreement, so that when the house sells, the payment will go to them.

Asked on August 25, 2011 California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I am so sorry for your situation.  It is difficult enough to deal with the death of one's parents but to have to deal with untrustworthy siblings on top of that, well, it is just unfair.  I do think that you can not do this alone.  You are going to need an attorney to help you.  First, let the attorney know about their attempt to sell.  You did not sign over the ownership rights, did you?  And is your name on the deed with your siblings?  That is the best way to insure that they can not transfer the house without your knowledge.  You also need to notify the listing agent about your intentions.  Although you may want to keep the house it may be best for you to be rid of them and their antics.  Just make sure that your share is protected.  Good luck. 


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