What do I do if I am Buying a car from a car Dealerships, but what they said in the Ad was not all the way True

I want on line looking for a car me and my wife found
07 Cadillac CTS for 4500 we thought good deal,call the
Car lot Talk to a Manager deal was made I gave them
1500 down on the 19th of june,the car was not ready to
be sold,the Previous owners are having Issue with the
bank,so how can they seal it to me like that, I did
everything they asked me to do I even have Insurance
on it but I still don’t have a car what do I do? Can
anyone help me

Asked on July 6, 2017 under Business Law, Montana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can sue them for your money back. You would sue them for two reasons: first, breach of contract--violating the agreement you entered into with them when you gave them the deposit and they agreed to sell you the car. You would also sue them for fraud: for lying to you about their right to sell the car. In addition to suing for your money back, you can also sue for the other expenses you incurred as a direct and foreseeable result--like the cost of the insurance you purchased. They can't give you this car if they don't have and can't get clean title to it, but you can get compensation and/or they could settle the case by offering you some other acceptable vehicle. For the amount of money at stake, you are best off suing in small claims court, as your own attorney or "pro se" to save legal expenses.


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