What can I do to get an insurance company to offer me a settlement?

I was involved in an auto accident 7 months ago. I finished up medical treatments last month. I have been calling the insurance company and emailing them every week for an update. I was told by different representatives that I would either hear about an offer by phone or receive a letter in 2 weeks. It’s now going on a month. Do I need to let them know I will be retaining a lawyer? The details were as follows: there 3 cars involved where at a stop light intersection. I had stopped at a light, the roads were icy and being cautious like most Alaskans. The 2 car stopped then 3rd didn’t stopped; she hit 2 who had hit me and the force pushed me in the intersection as the light turned green for the other people enter the section. Cops and ambulance were called and 3rd car was cited for not being cautious and watchful of other cars. A few days after the accident my right upper arm/shoulder were hurting. I received treatment. Here is the quirk about the accident the 3rd car wasn’t registered to the girl it was her friend’s car who had lend it to her for work only while she was in Peru. The mother of the daughter is the owner of the car who lives in Kodiak AK. She had called me a few days after the accident.

that sums it up.

Asked on June 14, 2016 under Accident Law, Alaska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Telling them that you are looking for a lawyer won't do anything: as the old saying goes, "talk is cheap," and *everyone* threaten that they'll get an attorney and sue.
No, to get their attention, sue them. If you suffered long last impairment or disability and/or a combination of out-of-pocket (not paid by your insurance) medical and property (auto) damage costs exceeding $5,000, hire an attorney to file suit for you; if you were fortunately enough to not suffer long-lasting disabiltiy or impairment and incurred less than $5,000 in out-of-pocket costs, you probably should file the suit yourself ("pro se") to save on legal fees.
You should sue the at-fault driver and also the owner of the car she was driving.
They can settle the suit at any time short of trial by offering you a settlement--you don't have to accept it, of course, if you think it's too low.


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