What can I do to force an insurance company to remove erroneous claim settlement information off of insurance databases?

My name appears on insurance databases reflecting that I received a $20,000 settlement from an insurance company for a homeowner’s claim filed August 2011 by my ex-husband. We were divorced over 1 1/2 years ago and I vacated the house the next month. The insurance agent said the check was made out to only my ex-spouse because he provided a copy of the divorce decree. I asked the agent why my name was not removed from the policy. After talking with several people at the insurance company for 2 hours they said their system would not allow them to correct the error. The insurance company I tried to get homeowner’s insurance with has denied me and others gave me astronomical quotes because now I am considered a “high risk”.

Asked on July 13, 2012 under General Practice, Georgia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The best way to try and remove reference from an insurance carrier's date base that you received a $20,000 settlement from a particular carrier is to write the insurance company and request a letter of explanation designated in the claim if the carrier will not correct the perceived error that you have written about.

One way to possibly force the issue is for you to retain an attorney that practices in the area of insurance law to write a letter to the insurance carrier seeking a letter of explanation.


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