What can I do about my former manager calling my present manager and telling them things that are not true?

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What can I do about my former manager calling my present manager and telling them things that are not true?

My former manager called my present manager today just to tell her that she knew that I worked there and told her things that were not true. I quit my job about 2 weeks ago. This is the second time the same manager has found out where I worked just to call and say things that were not true. Is there anything I can do? It’s almost like she is stalking me and trying to keep me from getting a good job. She has even went to the extent of telling my manager’s husband things about me that were not true.

Asked on April 6, 2012 under Personal Injury, Arkansas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You could potentially sue her for defamation, seeking both monetary compensation and a court order directing her too cease doing this. Defamation is when a person publically--which includes to any third parties, like your new employer--makes untrue factual statements which damage a person's reputation. If what this former manager is saying are factual statements or claims about you (and not true facts, even if negative, or opinions, no matter how bad), she may be committing defamation. You may wish to speak with a personal injury attorney about bringing a lawsuit.


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