What can an insurance ask for to pay a life insurance policy?

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What can an insurance ask for to pay a life insurance policy?

My father recently passed and he had 4 different small insurance policies. The beneficiary on each policy was my mother who passed away in 2014, he never changed this after she passed. So we have ended up in probate. But on one policy I was listed as the contingent beneficiary. They are asking me for the original policy, this doesn’t seem right to send the original, then I have nothing to prove there ever a policy. They are also asking for a police report because this was deemed an accidental death. He was burned badly trying to put out a brush fire and died of his injuries but I can’t find a police report. Is this the correct way to take care of an insurance policy?

Asked on August 31, 2019 under Estate Planning, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

If you don't provide what they want, you'll end up having to sue them for the policy benefits, because they will use your refusal as grounds to deny the claim. You might well win the lawsuit, but better to try and resolve without litigation if possible.
Scan and photocopy the policy: you can sue the scan and copy in court later, should they refuse to pay and you need to sue.
Contact the PD to get a copy of the police report.
Send everything some way you can prove delivery and receipt.
 
 
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