How do I get my landlord to pay for my motel costsdue to my vacating during abed bug extermination next door?

Our neighbors have bed bugs and the landlord has told us since the poison is highly toxic, we have to leave our apartment for the day. My husband is disabled with lung cancer, COPD, and asthma, not to mention we have no family for 200 miles. Can we submit our rent payment minus cost of the motel room with a receipt for the room? Can the landlord make us pay for the room out of our pocket?

Asked on August 28, 2011 Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you are being forced to vacate the rented unit your are occupying due to health and safety considerations due to insect extermination from the adjoining apartment, your landord is obligated under your state's laws to reimburse you for the expenses you incur for motel costs while you are not occupying your rental.

The best way to be reimbursed for such is to write your landlord a letter advising him or her that you will be icurring these costs or have incurred these costs and inquire how he or she wishes to square up on them. Meaning, do you pay the full rent for the following month or deduct the costs  for the motel from it? Keep a copy of the letter for future need and reference.

If the landlord tries to have you pay for the motel expenses out of your own pocket without no reimbursement, that is wrong in that he or she has an obligation to have a safe unit. Being displaced is the result of problems with the complex that the owner is required to rectify out of his or her own pocket book.

Good luck.


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