Validity of out of state will?

1. Our will and trust was drawn up in
Illinois. We moved to PA 2 years ago.
Is our out of state will and trust valid in
PA?

2. My 88 year old mother just moved in
with us from Ohio.I have power of
attorney. Same question. Is her will
from Ohio still valid here?

3. What action do We/I need to take in
PA?

Asked on July 23, 2017 under Estate Planning, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If you prepared a Will in your old state of residence and it was valid there, then it’s valid in your new state as well. The same generally holds true for a revocable living Trust and Power of Attorney. However, having a local attorney review all of the documents could well be worth your while. This way you'll have peace of mind just for paying for an hour or so of their time. Some of these documents may need updating based on a change in life circumstances (e.g. a named benficiary in the Will has since passed away, etc.).

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If you prepared a Will in your old state of residence and it was valid there, then it’s valid in your new state as well. The same generally holds true for a revocable living Trust and Power of Attorney. However, having a local attorney review all of the documents could well be worth your while. This way you'll have peace of mind just for paying for an hour or so of their time. Some of these documents may need updating based on a change in life circumstances (e.g. a named benficiary in the Will has since passed away, etc.).


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