What are my rights if my former employer made false allegations about me reagrding a theft at work?

This happened about 3 weeks ago. I work at a jewelry storewas accused of stealing gold. When my boss brought it to my attention I gave him permission to search my belongings, even my car for the stolen gold. He did not find anything because I didn’t steal anything. I was the only person that had my things searched even though there were 2 others working. He brought in a police officer and from what I understand I was the only suspect. I have yet to speak to a detective and the officer didn’t talk to me. About a week or so late, overheard my co-workers joking about whether my boss would fire me to my face or over the phone. He ended up firing me the next day after my shift. Would I be able to sue for defamation? I can’t afford a lawyer.

Asked on September 6, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Kentucky

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I suggest that you first consult with a representative at your local department of labor to see what legal recourse you may have over your termination from work. You should also make a claim for unemployment benefits as well and see if your employer contests such or not. If he or she does not, then the employer will be hard pressed to claim that you were terminated over a theft issue.

As to a possible defamation claim, contact your local legal aid clinic to see if there is an attorney who can give you legal advice or even representation as to your matter.


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