What is the statute of limitations for a patio installation?

We had a patio installed in 2 years ago. There were major areas of discoloration and we told our contractor. He said that it needed to cure. Yet, 6 months later, there was still the discoloration. After many meetings with the contractors pointing at each other as to “why” it happened, they finally agreed to have a “coating” painted over it; this was 15 moths ago. By about 7 months ago,some of the areas were blistering/peeling and now all of them are faded. Do we still legally have the right to tell them to tear out and replace the concrete?

Asked on August 2, 2012 under Business Law, Arizona

Answers:

Anne Brady / Law Office of Anne Brady

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The statute of limitations in Arizona for breach of a written contract is six years.  I assume you have a written contract with this contractor.  If you feel you have a claim for breach of that contract because work was not as promised in that contract, you are still well within that six-year window.

Anne Brady / Law Office of Anne Brady

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The statute of limitations in Arizona for breach of a written contract is six years.  I assume you have a written contract with this contractor.  If you feel you have a claim for breach of that contract because work was not as promised in that contract, you are still well within that six-year window.


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