State Farm

I had Allstate for home and Auto for about 30 years. Last year the agent ignored
a request and never called me back on it. I have only had one claim on my car
about 12 years ago and none on my house. I decided to shop around and landed
with State Farm where I filled out the complete application over the phone and
stated to them then that I had a cedar shake roof. Four months later they inform
me that I have to replace my roof. I have had at least three roofers look at it
and tell me it was fine. Can they do this. I feel like they lied to me when
they took my application knowing full well I had a shake roof and then telling me
to replace it or they will not insure me. Obviously, I would not have gone with
them if I knew this was going to happen. I think they should have been upfront
with me. It’s somewhat fraudulent in my opinion. Do I have any recourse?

Asked on May 16, 2016 under Insurance Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

They are not forcing you to replace the roof: they are saying that if you want them to cover you, you will have to replace the roof. You have the right to shop around further for insurance--just as they don't have to cover you if you do not meet their criteria, you don't have to stay with them, or satisfy their demands. Of course, if you shop around and find it is difficult to get coverage with this type of roof that will tell you that their request is not unreasonable.


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