SR-22 Process in Wisconsin for 1st time OWI

I would like to better understand the SR-22 process in Wisconsin which is the conditional occupational driving permit that an individual can request who has had his license revoked for 6 months following an OWI. I am told that the SR-22 process starts with my insurance carrier and even though I only need the occupational driving licence for 6 months, that I have to pay the premium upcharge for 3 years. Does that vary by insurance company or is that a WI state requirement? Also, how long does it generally take to receive this license once it is applied for? Thank-you.Bart

Asked on June 16, 2009 under Criminal Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

N. K., Member, Iowa and Illinois Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You may receive your license the same day you apply for it at a DMV office (it takes at least 2 hours to process the application).

If it is necessary for the DMV to fax your application to the Driver Information Section in Madison for a review of your driving record and application, you may be asked to return the next day or the next time that the DMV office is open.

Not sure if the terms vary by insurance companies or if it is state-mandated, but you may want to compare other insurance companies and see if they offer you better terms.


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