Sources

Is there some sort of reliable source
to look at when viewing your rights as
an ‘at will’ employee? I think I’ve
been screwed over on multiple
occasions, but I am not sure what is
legal.

Asked on March 18, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

There are many online sites (including this one) that can provide information about your rights as an "at will" employee. Generally, it helps to formulate the question precisely. That said, as a general matter: you have *no* rights as an at will employee.
Employment at will means not only can the employer terminate you at will--that is, at any time, for any reason whatsoever, including unfair or factually incorrect ones--but also:
1) The employer can change your job at any time: transfer or relocate you, change your shift or hours, change your duties or title, etc.
2) The employer can change any aspect of your compensation at will: change or reduce pay, how you are paid (salary vs. hourly), vacation and sick days or other PTO, etc.
3) Since you can be terminated at will, the employer can do anything less than that at will: demote you, suspend you, put you on probation or improvement plans, etc.
4) You can be required to sign a nondisclosure or noncomptetion, etc. agreement at any time, on pain of termination.
5) The employer may make you work as many hours as it likes, subject only to the obligation to pay hourly employees for all hours worked and to pay nonexempt staff overtime when they work more than 40 hours in a week.
6) The workplace can be unpleasant, supervisors abusive...you can be belittled, demeaned, insulted, etc. at will, except that you cannot be harassed for a specifically protected characteristic, principally race, national origin, age 40 or over, sex, religion, or disability.


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