Shouldnt i be informed by my employer that ive been temanted?

I work for a hotel i am the breakfast
attendant and front desk 1st 2nd and
3rd rotating shifts. I started middle
Oct. 2016 ive missed 1 day excused with
dr. Note. A personal problem came up
and i couldnt make it for my shift. I
called the assistant manager who didnt
answer i sent him 3 text messages and
still no reply. I have saved these call
times and text messages in case the
owner needed proof . the next day i go
in to work and ive been taken of the
schedule and they brought in someone
else to work my shift needless to say i
went home called borh assistant and
owner of hotel and ive not heard a
single word from either of them going
on 3 days now. What do i do ?

Asked on January 5, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

There is no law that requires an employer to give official notice of discharge to an employee. Most employment is "at will". This means that unless there exisits a union agreement, employment contract or the like that mandates you be so notified, your company is under no legal obligation to provide you with a termination notice. The fact is that a worker can be fired for any reason or no reason at all, with or without notice. That having been said, if you are off of the schedule indefinitely then you may be considered to be "constructively discharged". In that case, so long as you were not fired for cause, you may be eligible to collect unemployment benefits.


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