Should we be reimbursed for work travel expenses?

Hi there, My fianc recently was hired for an
event and had to travel to TN. The company
was supposed to pay travel and hotel
expenses. However, on the day he was
supposed to come home the truck broke down,
and we are now paying out of pocket to get him
home. Are we entitled to be reimbursed for his
flight, seeing that them paying for travel was a
stipulation to him going? He has a second job
so he has to be flown home and cant stay the
extra days that it would take for them to fix the
truck

Asked on March 22, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

If there was, as indicated, an agreement, made before the trip, that they would pay his travel expenses, then yes, they should reimburse you: when the truck broke down, they still had to pay to get him home. Such an agreement is enforceable in court if necessary. That, though, is the problem: the only way to enforce it, if they won't voluntarily pay, is by suing, and suing your employer is a very drastic step. Your fiance has to weigh carefully whether it is worth taking legal action for the amount of money at stake. If he does decide to sue, he will sue for "breach of contract"--violating the agreement--and will have to convince the court of the the existence and terms of the agreement (this is much easier if it was in writing than if it was an oral, or unwritten, agreement).


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