Should I show my dash cam footage?

About 2 years ago, while stopped at a traffic light, traffic started rolling then stopped again. I let off my brake and rolled into the car in front of me bumping him. There was a police officer right next to us and witnessed this accident, the car I bumped, the police, and I pulled over we were all okay the police said we could go about our business but the guy I bumped wanted a report. There was not even a scratch on either car and I did not receive a ticket or anything. I just found out im being sued buy the guy I bumped my question is should I show my dash camera footage or not? In the footage the bump looks a little more violent then what it really was but the footage also shows that there is no damage to the guy’s car and that he got out of the car

smiling and that he was wearing the cardboard and plastic sunglasses from the eye doctor where he just had his eyes dilated I’m pretty sure you are not supposed to drive if you have had your eyes dilated. So Will the footage help me or be used against me in court?

Asked on January 3, 2019 under Accident Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

His eye dilation is wholly irrelevant: he was not moving and you hit him, so the state of his eyes did not impact the accident or make it not your fault.
You are at fault no matter what: the rear driver essentially always is, as is the driver hitting a stationary vehicle. So the footage will not harm you in terms of establishing fault: as stated, you are already at fault. If you believe it will show that his car did not suffer any damage he is suing you for, then it would be helpful.


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