Should I pay the company or try to fight them?

I worked in a retail store for about a year now. Within that year I had gotten promoted twice and worked really hard in the store. When I was first hired I was told that we were allowed to give customers a discount as long as they applied for our credit card approved or denied. The company started to stricken the rule as of March 2016 in which our store manager made each of us read over papers and sign them saying we would only give out the discount if customers got approved for the card. Apparently the company had been monitoring every transaction we were doing since

February 2016. According to them I had been giving out discounts to people ‘just because’ I alone supposedly cost the company over $1,000 in the month of February. I admitted to giving a discount to people I knew a few times and now

I have been fired and have to pay back $960. My problem is that I gave a discount thout ‘just because’ a handful of times and of those times maybe once or twice not even in the month of February. So I’m not quit sure how there calculations work out. I wrote a statement saying that yes I had giving out discounts before ‘just because,’ because they told me to do it but I was not aware that I would be fired for this, only suspended. Everyone has given out discounts in this store ‘just because’ so why are they not being monitored or reprimanded? My question is should I pay the money

back or dig a little deeper and fight it ?

Asked on March 22, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, New Jersey

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If you gave out discounts in violation of store policy, you can be required to repay the money--if you don't, they could sue you with a good chance of winning. It's reasonable though to ask them to show you how they came to that number. If after that, you agree, then pay (but get something in writing that this fully settles the matter); if you don't agree with the sum and they won't reduce what they are asking for, then you could refuse to pay and make them sue you; they will only be able to get the amount of improper discounts they can prove.


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