Should I get paid more then just the cost of the meidcal bills from my accident?

I was riding in a car that was hit by another vehicle. The other vehicle did not have insurance. The insurance company of the vehicle that I was riding in, is wanting to settle just for the amount of my medical bills (11,756). Is that normal or should I get more then the amount of bills that I have. The bills are from the ambulance and emergency room. Should I speak with a personal injury attorney? I’m in Atascosa, TX. 

Asked on October 12, 2011 under Estate Planning, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

A settlement is basically an agreement between two parties.  You can agree to less than you are entitled to, but you are not required to settle for less.  Damages for an accident like you have described can include claims for medical bills, pain and suffering, lost wages, future medical and compensation for other unique injuries.  Pain-and-suffering is usually the part of a settlement which is the hardest to put a price tag on.  Even though $11,756.00 is a great deal of money for most people, it’s probably not a high dollar personal injury case, but it does demonstrate that maybe you could seek more in the way of damages, loss of income, or future medical expenses.  A personal injury attorney can help you identify what types of damages you should be compensated for in your personal injury lawsuit.  Many personal injury attorneys will offer inexpensive or free consultations.  Considering what you may be giving up, it would be worth your time to visit with one or two and get their opinion about your specific situation.  Take as much information as possible with you.  Items like medical records and copies of accident reports will give the attorney even more information on which to base an assessment of your case.  As a general rule, signing an agreement without having an attorney review it first usually results in a waiver of several potential claims or remedies… so visit with a personal injury attorney before you rush to sign the dotted line.


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