If I want to purchase a house, am I correct with not allowing the seller’s attorney to inspect our house before the formal offer is accepted?

We have been wanting to purchase our neighbor’s house. It is a second home for them. It has been on the market for 4 years and we offered them a much lower offer then they were asking a couple of years ago $425,000 vs asking price of $550,000. They are now ready to accept our offer but mentioned that their lawyer would like to look over our house. I do not feel comfortable with this and feel a formal home inspection is better. We will also be bring in a real estate agent to provide advice on what we need to invest in the house to sell our house quickly

selling our our is a contingency for purchasing our neighbor’s house. I am sure their attorney wants to make sure our house is going to sell quickly. We are willing to invest in our current house to help it sell quickly.

Asked on April 18, 2016 under Real Estate Law, Vermont

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

There is no "correct" or "incorrect" in this case, since the law neither requires nor prohibits this. It is whatever  the buyer and seller agree to. If there is already a signed contract, they can't add this as a requirement if it's not already in the contract--they can ask, of course, but if it's not in the contract, you don't have to do it. But if there is no signed contract, which appears to be the case from your question, they can say they will not agree to sell to you unless you agree to let them inspect; then it's up to you whether you are willing to do this or not.  You could walk away from the proposed transaction if you are not willing to let them inspect.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.