Problem with a person

The booking agent at a bar in
Wallingford called up every single
live music venue in the state and
told them I harrass women. All
because I called her fat one night.
I had over 20 gigs booked around
the state, she called every club
owner and talked bullshit to get
all my gigs cancelled. What to do
about her?

Asked on September 12, 2018 under Business Law, Connecticut

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

IF she is actually lying about you--telling factually untrue things--you can sue her for defamation and also for tortious intereference with business or economic advantage (using improper means to interfere with business), seeking either or both or an order that she desist from doing so or monetary compensation. The key is, she must be lying. She may tell anyone a true thing about you, even if it hurts you. She may also express an opinion.
Example: she tells people you called her fat--that is true, based on what you write; she may say that and you can't do anything to stop it.
She tells people that she feels you are cruel or that you judge women only by their opinion; that is her opinion, and she may say that.
But if she tells people you said that she is worthless or ugly or that no one will ever want her, when you did not in fact make those statements: that is stating a factually untrue thing that harms you, and you could sue her for defamation.
A personal injury attorney (the ones who handle slip-and-fall or car accident cases) generally also handles defamation; if you want to explore this option of suing her, consult wth such a lawyer.


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