Overtime hours

I work as a casino game tech from home. I am
paid based on a 40 hr work week. Except we
work 12 hr shifts 5 days a week. Every other
weekend we are scheduled to work 24 hr shifts
for that Saturday and Sunday 48 hrs which
we are not paid OT. Is this right?

Asked on March 13, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Overtime is based on weekly hours, not daily, or how many hours are worked in a row. A non-exempt employee (which includes all hourly employees) is entitled to overtime for all hours worked past 40 during a single week (Sun. to Saturday). Say you work 60 hours in a week--if you are not exempt, you would get 20 hours at overtime rates, whether you worked five 12-hour days, four-fifteen hour days, etc. If you are not paid overtime when you believe you should be, contact your state department of labor about filing a wage and hour complaint.
(This answer does not apply to tribal casinos, since tribes are semi-soveign and many state and federal laws do not apply. If you are working at a Native American casino, you have to consult with an attorney handling tribal law and who is familiar with the labor laws of  this tribe.)

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Overtime is based on weekly hours, not daily, or how many hours are worked in a row. A non-exempt employee (which includes all hourly employees) is entitled to overtime for all hours worked past 40 during a single week (Sun. to Saturday). Say you work 60 hours in a week--if you are not exempt, you would get 20 hours at overtime rates, whether you worked five 12-hour days, four-fifteen hour days, etc. If you are not paid overtime when you believe you should be, contact your state department of labor about filing a wage and hour complaint.
(This answer does not apply to tribal casinos, since tribes are semi-soveign and many state and federal laws do not apply. If you are working at a Native American casino, you have to consult with an attorney handling tribal law and who is familiar with the labor laws of  this tribe.)


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