DoI have to pay to pay our internet billif the company didn’t bill us for 9 months?

I called to let them know they were not billing us now they want the money.

Asked on December 28, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Ohio

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Do you owe the money? That  is, did you receive the services for which you are being billed? Is the calculation of the bill corect? Etc. If you do owe the money, then yes, you have to pay the bill. It would be fair and reasonable for the company to give you some time to pay, since they were at fault in not billing on time or regularly--but they are not required to do so. They can ask for all the money due them immediately. They may not charge you any late fees or interest for the past nine months however, since it was not your doing that you were late--though if you don't pay within the proper time frame (usually 30 days) now, then they can start accruing fees or interest if the service agreement or contract permists it. They also can't "retroactively" report you to credit rating agencies or take other collection actions, though if you don't pay now, they may do so.


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