What to do if our daughter attends a vocation school and was told she could not attend next year because of too many doctor appointments?

Our daughter suffers from muscular distrophy and has had it her whole life. She is 21 now and attends a vocational state funded school. She is also the recipient of social security disability. Today her program administrator told her she could not come back next year because she missed too much time. The time she missed was because of medical reasons.Is this to say disabled persons arent entitled to an education because of medical issues. Her most recent time lost was because she had her throat streched to better facilitate swallowing. Is this discrimination?

Asked on May 31, 2012 under Personal Injury, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I would consult with an attorney to represent your daughter who has a physical malady to respond to the school's administration with respect to the position that she could not attend the school the following year because she has had too many doctor appointments.

So long as she is getting the minimum passing grade there seems to be no legal basis for the vocational school to terminate your daughter's attendance there. To do so seems to be improper and discriminatory based upon her muscular distrophy condition. In the private business sector, employers need to make reasonable accomodations for employees who may have a physical impediment. The same should hold true with respect to the private vocational school attended by your daughter.

I suggest retaining an attorney that practices educational law to assist.


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