Not sure if im fired or quit

I came into work with my resignation letter of two weeks, as I handed over the letter I was informed I was being dismissed. They did not hand back the letter to me they kept it but they also did not say that my resignation was accepted. I honestly do not know how to handle the situation on future job applications

Asked on June 13, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Alabama

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Even if they did not take the letter, generally, if you had at least orally indicated you were resigning or giving notice, then you would have quit or resigned: when you give notice, the employer can treat it as effective immediately and does not need to respect the two-weeks notice you offered.
That said, there is certainly ambiguity in the situation: put it down however you believe is best and are comfortable describing it (can say it in good faith, without lying about facts). If your description is challenged, simply state the facts and explain why you characterized it the way you did: for example, if you'd rather say you resigned, if asked, state you came in to resign and had started giving your notice when the manager said you were dismissed, and so, since his dismissal was evidently prompted by your giving notice, you consider the situation to be that you had resigned.


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