What are my legal options regarding anoisy neighbor?

I have lived in my rent stabilized apartment for approximately 16 years. A new neighbor moved in above me about 6 months ago. He does not play loud music but entertains almost every night of the week as well as all day and night on weekend days. He seems to have his buddies over from 7-10 or 11 pm during the week and 3-11 pm on a Saturday. It is only a 2 room unit. There is constant walking around and moving of furniture and placing of loud objects on the floor. Rarely is there 10 minutes of silence and the noise is often jolting. I have the TV and air conditioning (in the spring had a sound machine on). I feel very intruded upon, like my home is no longer my home. I have written and spoken to the landlord and requested a meeting with the neighbor to try to resolve the situation. According the the landlord the neighbor has not responded to his requests. I have also written to the tenant requesting he get thicker rugs, not wear shoes, perhaps entertain a bit less, etc. He wrote back agreeing but does not comply. What are my options?

Asked on August 18, 2011 New York

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

From what you have written, the landlord has been pretty responsive to your inquries about the new neighbor. Unfortunately, the new neighbor has not.

I suggest you contact the entity in charge of the rent stabilization program for the apartment you are in. Potentially the noisy neighbor is part of the same program. If the neighbor is, then perhaps the a representative of the program will intervene.

If not, and the neighbor continues to make the unwarranted noise, you should have a meeting with the landlord requesting that this neighbor be evicted for causing a nuisance and see what transpires.

Another option is to sue the neighbor for causing a nuisance for the noise caused. Unfortunately such an action is expensive and time consuming.

Good luck.


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