What can we do if my son was riding a bicycle on a road with no sidewalks and a US postal vehicle hit him and kept going?

She (postal employee) stopped about 30 feet later after hearing my son yell. She got out, asked him if he was alright. He said no, it hurt his privates (he is 17). She did not respond, then left and kept delivering mail. I got a call from him. He said he was alright but the bike was bent and his privates (nuts) hurt. His brother was about a football field in front of him and saw him in the road next to her car. He was also on a bike. I made a police report. They said nothing could be done. I told the post office who it was, they said they would call me. It is actually the lady that always delivers our mail on our road. Is this normal?

Asked on December 9, 2015 under Accident Law, Alabama

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Whether or not the police will press charges, you have the right to sue the Post Office for the cost to repair his bicycle and for any medical care he needs. But it is more complicated and challenging to sue the government than a private party, so unless it's a fairly considerable amount of money, it may not be worth the time, cost, and effort. 
In terms of otherwise (without suing) getting some response, if the post office doesn't get back to you and respond to your satisfaction, try going over the local office's head to the regional office; also try contacting your local Congressman's office and asking for help as a constituent.


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