My son just married a Ukrainian …both college seniors…..recosponsor I-864

They discovered they needed a co-sponsor for income satisfaction. Do we as co-sponsor file a “separate” I-864 and can it be hidden from the children’s view as we don’t wish to share with them our income/tax status etc. Is there a form/waiver for the immigrant spouse to sign that absolves attempts to the co-sponsor of being sued if divorce ensues. Is this a separate codicil that a lawyer would need to create. What would it cost for such approximately? Are there application and ongoing costs, as well as future financial releases, to apply and maintain this co-sponsor relationship?

Asked on January 20, 2018 under Immigration Law, California

Answers:

SB Member California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

As a  sponsor, you can have the attorney submit the form with all the other forms so that the children do not see it but if you are not using an attorney and the children submit on their own, I don't see how you can keep it from them.  As for absolving any liability in the event of divorce, there is none.  The affidavit of support essentially serves as a contract between you and the government in that if the immigrant applies for any means-tested assistance, then the government can back to you for reimbursement.


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