What to do if both my wife and I had seperate medical coverage before our daughter was born but neither will pick up the birth bills?

Over a year ago I contacted my insurer to pre-certify so that when my fiancee gave birth to our child she would have medical coverage. I was told that I had to call back after she was born and I could then add her to the policy. So after the birth, I did what I was told and called to get her enrolled and assumed that was all that was necessary. When we were at the hospital, neither my wife’s insurance information or mine was never taken. Now, neither insurer wants to pick up the 15k plus bill for the birth. We were both covered at the time so this should not be an issue.

Asked on June 26, 2012 under Insurance Law, New Jersey

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Whether or not you and your wife had medical insurance coverage for the birth of a child depends upon what is listed in your medical insurance policies and which is not excluded. As such, you need to carefully read your policies in that such documents control the obligations owed to you by your insurance carriers and vice versa.

After you have read your policies, I suggest that you contact your carriers for a written explanation why the birth of your child is not being covered. I the explanation does not meet your satisfaction, then you should consult with an attorney that practices in the area of insurance law about the situation.


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